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Aeronautical Engineering

1120. Introduction to Engineering Mechanics
This introductory course in mechanics of solids is based on the multimedia ebook developed in University of Oklahoma. The material include case studies, examples and simulations with visually appealing graphics for illustration purposes. The case studies are useful for relating theory to real world engineering applications. Topics covered include stress and strain, torsion, shear and moment in beams, beam stresses, beam deflections, advanced beams, stress analysis, strain analysis and columns. (Video lectures are not available for this course but it includes very good course content)
(Prof. Kurt Gramoll, University of Oklahoma)

1130. Mechanics & Materials I
This course provides an introduction to the mechanics of solids with applications to science and engineering. We emphasize the three essential features of all mechanics analyses, namely: (a) the geometry of the motion and/or deformation of the structure, and conditions of geometric fit, (b) the forces on and within structures and assemblages; and (c) the physical aspects of the structural system (including material properties) which quantify relations between the forces and motions/deformation.
(Prof. Carol Livermore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1210. Fluid Mechanics
This course covers the physical properties of a fluid and their consequence on fluid flow, expressed in terms of Mach and Reynolds numbers. Students are taught the conservation principles of mass, momentum, and energy for fluid flow and how to apply the basic mathematical tools that support fluid dynamics. They will learn the conceptual and quantitative models of inviscid, steady fluid flow over simple bodies (airfoils, wings) and in channels. (Video recordings of lectures are not available but this course includes a good set of lecture notes and course material)
(Prof. Mark Drela, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1220. Fluid Mechanics II
This course covers the physical properties of a fluid and their consequence on fluid flow, expressed in terms of Mach and Reynolds numbers. Students are taught the conservation principles of mass, momentum, and energy for fluid flow and how to apply the basic mathematical tools that support fluid dynamics. They will learn the conceptual and quantitative models of inviscid, steady fluid flow over simple bodies (airfoils, wings) and in channels. This is a continuation of the course Fluid Mechanics. A few of the more important topics will be taken to a moderately advanced level in this course. (Video recordings of lectures are not available but this course includes a good set of lecture notes and course material)
(Prof. Mark Drela, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1310. Introductory Thermodynamics
This is an introductory course in thermodynamics based on the excellent multimedia ebook developed in University of Oklahoma. The material include case studies, examples and simulations with visually appealing graphics for illustration purposes. Topics covered include pure substances, first law of thermodynamics, energy analysis, gas power cycle, brayton cycle and rankine cycle. (Video lectures are not available for this course but it includes very effective course material)
(Meirong Huang, Prof. Kurt Gramoll, University of Oklahoma)

1350. Thermodynamics
The objective of the course is to enable students to use the First Law of Thermodynamics to estimate the potential for thermo-mechanical energy conversion particularly in aerospace power and propulsion systems. This course is taught as part of the Unified Engineering course in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. (Video recordings of lectures are not available but this course includes a very good set of lecture notes and course material)
(Prof. Ian Waitz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

2110. Aerodynamics
This course extends fluid mechanic concepts to the aerodynamic performance of wings and bodies in sub/supersonic regimes. The course has four components: (i) subsonic potential flows, including source/vortex panel methods; (ii) viscous flows, including laminar and turbulent boundary layers; (iii) aerodynamics of airfoils and wings, including thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and panel method/interacting boundary layer methods; (iv) and supersonic and hypersonic airfoil theory.
(Prof. David Darmofal, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4250. Space Shuttle Systems Engineering
This course focuses on a systems engineering analysis of the Space Shuttle. It offers study of both design and operations of the shuttle, with frequent lectures by outside experts. Topics include basic systems engineering; cost and weight estimation; basic aircraft performance; safety and reliability; lifecycle topics; aircraft subsystems; risk analysis and management; and system realization.
This course was administrated by shuttle astronaut and MIT Professor Jeff Hoffman and Professor Aaron Cohen, who was the Space Shuttle Orbiter Project Manager. Guest speakers provide the majority of the content in video lectures, discussing topics such as system design, accident investigation, and the future of NASA's space mission.
(Prof. Jeffrey Hoffman, Prof. Aaron Cohen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

 

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