Education For All

www.edforall.net

Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Mechanical Engineering

1120. Introduction to Engineering Mechanics
This introductory course in mechanics of solids is based on the multimedia ebook developed in University of Oklahoma. The material include case studies, examples and simulations with visually appealing graphics for illustration purposes. The case studies are useful for relating theory to real world engineering applications. Topics covered include stress and strain, torsion, shear and moment in beams, beam stresses, beam deflections, advanced beams, stress analysis, strain analysis and columns. (Video lectures are not available for this course but it includes very good course content)
(Prof. Kurt Gramoll, University of Oklahoma)

1130. Mechanics & Materials I
This course provides an introduction to the mechanics of solids with applications to science and engineering. We emphasize the three essential features of all mechanics analyses, namely: (a) the geometry of the motion and/or deformation of the structure, and conditions of geometric fit, (b) the forces on and within structures and assemblages; and (c) the physical aspects of the structural system (including material properties) which quantify relations between the forces and motions/deformation.
(Prof. Carol Livermore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1250. Fluid Mechanics
This is an introductory course in fluid mechanics based on the excellent multimedia ebook developed in University of Oklahoma. The material include case studies, examples and simulations with visually appealing graphics for illustration purposes. Topics covered include fluid statics and kinematics, fundamental laws, Navier-Stokes and Euler's equations, modeling and similitude, inviscid flow, viscous flow, drag, lift, boundary layer and open-channel flow. (Video lectures are not available for this course but the excellent content available more than make up for it)
(Chean Chin Ngo, Prof. Kurt Gramoll, University of Oklahoma)

1310. Introductory Thermodynamics
This is an introductory course in thermodynamics based on the excellent multimedia ebook developed in University of Oklahoma. The material include case studies, examples and simulations with visually appealing graphics for illustration purposes. Topics covered include pure substances, first law of thermodynamics, energy analysis, gas power cycle, brayton cycle and rankine cycle. (Video lectures are not available for this course but it includes very effective course material)
(Meirong Huang, Prof. Kurt Gramoll, University of Oklahoma)

1510. Dynamics and Control I
This class is an introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Topics include kinematics; force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion; work-energy concepts; virtual displacements and virtual work; Lagrange's equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion; linearization of equations of motion; linear stability analysis of mechanical systems; free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems; and matrix eigenvalue problems. The class includes an introduction to numerical methods and using MATLABĀ® to solve dynamics and vibrations problems. Video lectures are available only for the first part of the course.
(Prof. Nicholas Makris, Prof. Sanjay Sarma, Prof. Peter So, Dr. Yahya Modarres-Sadeghi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

2210. Introduction to Robotics
This is a very interesting course on robotics taught by Prof. Oussama Khatib in Stanford. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to basics of modeling, design, planning, and control of robot systems. In essence, the material treated in this course is a brief survey of relevant results from geometry, kinematics, statics, dynamics, and control. Topics include robotics foundations in kinematics, dynamics, control, motion planning, trajectory generation, programming and design.
(Prof. Oussama Khatib, Winter 2007/2008, Stanford University: Stanford Engineering Everywhere)

3510. BioEngineering-Structural Aspects of Biomaterials
This course covers the mechanical and structural aspects of biological tissues and their replacements. Tissue structure and mechanical function are addressed. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical and medical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are also examined. (Includes a full set of video lectures.)
(Prof. Lisa Pruitt, University of California, Berkeley: Webcast.Berkeley)

4010. Numerical Fluid Mechanics
This course provides an introduction to numerical methods. These include number representation and errors, interpolation, differentiation, integration, systems of linear equations, and Fourier interpolation and transforms. Students will study partial and ordinary differential equations as well as elliptic and parabolic differential equations, and solutions by numerical integration, finite difference methods, finite element methods, boundary element methods, and panel methods.
(Prof. Henrik Schmidt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4105. Solar cells
This course covers advanced semiconductor devices as a new source of energy for the 21st century, delivering electricity directly from sunlight. The suitable semiconductor materials, device physics, and fabrication technologies for solar cells are presented. The guidelines for design of a complete solar cell system for household application are explained. The cost aspects, market development, and the application areas of solar cells are also presented.
(Dr. Miro Zeman, Delft University of Technology)

4110. Fundamentals of Photovoltaics
In this course students will learn how solar cells convert light into electricity, how solar cells are manufactured, how solar cells are evaluated, what technologies are currently on the market, and how to evaluate the risk and potential of existing and emerging solar cell technologies. (An excellent online resource entitled "Photovoltaics: Devices, Systems and Applications" is available for free access.)
(Prof. Tonio Buonassisi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4210. Tribology
This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication.
(Prof. Nam Suh, Dr. Nannaji Saka, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4310. Control of Manufacturing Processes
This course explores statistical modeling and control in manufacturing processes. Topics include the use of experimental design and response surface modeling to understand manufacturing process physics, as well as defect and parametric yield modeling and optimization. Various forms of process control, including statistical process control, run by run and adaptive control, and real-time feedback control, are covered. Application contexts include semiconductor manufacturing, conventional metal and polymer processing, and emerging micro-nano manufacturing processes.
(Prof. Duane Boning, Prof. David Hardt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4510. Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices
This course is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process.
(Prof. Carol Livermore, Prof. Joel Voldman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

4610. Offshore Wind Farm Design
This is a very interesting course on offshore wind farms. It covers the design of offshore wind farms in general and the foundation design in particular. It is based on actual cases of real offshore wind farms that have been built recently or will be built in the near future. The course gives a general overview of the different components, equipment and parties involved in the design of offshore wind farms. It focusses on general wind farm layout, grid connection, installation methodology and covers in depth the design of the offshore wind turbine for the specific offshore location. An excellent set of lecture material is included.
(Dr.ir. J. van der Tempel, Delft University of Technology)

 

Translate

Chinese (Simplified) French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish
More educational resources: