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Physics

1010. Introduction to Physics
This is an introductory physics course in Berkeley primarily for non-science students. It covers interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, superconductors, and quantum physics.
(Prof. Richard Muller, Prof. Robert Jacobsen, University of California, Berkeley: Webcast.Berkeley)

1100. Classical Mechanics
This course is conducted by Prof. Walter Lewin at MIT well-known for his dynamic and engaging teaching style. This is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Resonance Phenomena, Musical Instruments, Stellar Collapse, Supernovae, Astronomical observations from very high flying balloons (lecture 35), and you will be allowed a peek into the intriguing Quantum World.
(Prof. Walter Lewin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1200. Electricity and Magnetism
This is another course conducted by Prof. Walter Lewin at MIT well-known for his dynamic and engaging teaching style. This is a second-semester freshman physics class in electromagnetism. In addition to the basic concepts of Electromagnetism, a vast variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Lightning, Pacemakers, Electric Shock Treatment, Electrocardiograms, Metal Detectors, Musical Instruments, Magnetic Levitation, Bullet Trains, Electric Motors, Radios, TV, Car Coils, Superconductivity, Aurora Borealis, Rainbows, Radio Telescopes, Interferometers, Particle Accelerators (a.k.a. Atom Smashers or Colliders), Mass Spectrometers, Red Sunsets, Blue Skies, Haloes around Sun and Moon, Color Perception, Doppler Effect, Big-Bang Cosmology.
(Prof. Walter Lewin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1300. Vibrations and Waves
This is another course conducted by Prof. Walter Lewin at MIT well-known for his dynamic and engaging teaching style. In addition to the traditional topics of mechanical vibrations and waves, coupled oscillators, and electro-magnetic radiation, students will also learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and big-bang cosmology.
(Prof. Walter Lewin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

1410. Fundamentals of Physics
This course provides a thorough introduction to the principles and methods of physics for students who have good preparation in physics and mathematics. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and quantitative reasoning. This course covers Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, gravitation, thermodynamics, and waves.
(Prof. Ramamurti Shankar, Yale University: Open Yale)

1910. Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics
This course focuses on three particularly interesting areas of astronomy that are advancing very rapidly: Extra-Solar Planets, Black Holes, and Dark Energy. Particular attention is paid to current projects that promise to improve our understanding significantly over the next few years. The course explores not just what is known, but what is currently not known, and how astronomers are going about trying to find out.
(Prof. Charles Bailyn, Yale University: Open Yale)

2310. Relativity
This course concentrates on special relativity. Topics covered include Einstein's postulates, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic effects and paradoxes, and applications involving electromagnetism and particle physics. This course also provides a brief introduction to some concepts of general relativity, including the principle of equivalence, the Schwartzschild metric and black holes, and the FRW metric and cosmology. (Includes a complete set of lecture slides and notes.)
(Prof. Max Tegmark, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare)

 

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