Education For All

www.edforall.net

Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Lectures (Video)

Course Home

Introductory Organic Chemistry - Lecture 19

Get the Flash Player to view video.
Lecture 19 - Oxygen and the Chemical Revolution (Beginning to 1789)

This lecture begins a series describing the development of organic chemistry in chronological order, beginning with the father of modern chemistry, Lavoisier. The focus is to understand the logic of the development of modern theory, technique and nomenclature so as to use them more effectively. Chemistry begins before Lavoisier's "Chemical Revolution," with the practice of ancient technology and alchemy, and with discoveries like those of Scheele, the Swedish apothecary who discovered oxygen and prepared the first pure samples of organic acids. Lavoisier's Traité Élémentaire de Chimie launched modern chemistry with its focus on facts, ideas, and words. Lavoisier weighed gases and measured heat with a calorimeter, as well as clarifying language and chemical thinking. His key concepts were conservation of mass for the elements and oxidation, a process in which reaction with oxygen could make a "radical" or "base" into an acid.

Prof. J. Michael McBride
CHEM 125: Freshman Organic Chemistry, Fall 2008
(Yale University: Open Yale)
http://oyc.yale.edu
Date accessed: 2009-11-11
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

Lecture Material

Click the play button to start the slideshow above (the slides will be displayed for 10 sec before advancing to the next slide). You can navigate the slides manually by using the back and forward buttons. Clicking the slide itself will advance to the next slide.

To download the above lecture material use this link. (Right-click and select Save Target As or Save Link As.)



 

Translate

Chinese (Simplified) French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish
More educational resources: