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Introductory Organic Chemistry - Lecture 20

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Lecture 20 - Rise of the Atomic Theory (1790-1805)

This lecture traces the development of elemental analysis as a technique for the determination of the composition of organic compounds beginning with Lavoisier's early combustion and fermentation experiments, which showed a new, if naïve, attitude toward handling experimental data. Dalton's atomic theory was consistent with the empirical laws of definite, equivalent, and multiple proportions. The basis of our current notation and of precise analysis was established by Berzelius, but confusion about atomic weight multiples, which could have been clarified early by the law of Avogadro and Gay-Lussac, would persist for more than half a century.

Prof. J. Michael McBride
CHEM 125: Freshman Organic Chemistry, Fall 2008
(Yale University: Open Yale)
http://oyc.yale.edu
Date accessed: 2009-11-11
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

Lecture Material

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Supplementary lecture material is listed below.

1. Lavoisier & the Chemical Revolution: Preface
2. Elements & Oxidation
3. How to determine Gas Density
4. Calorimeter
5. Combustion of Phosphorus and Carbon



 

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