Education For All

www.edforall.net

Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Lectures (Video)

Course Home

Introductory Organic Chemistry - Lecture 21

Get the Flash Player to view video.
Lecture 21 - Berzelius to Liebig and Wöhler (1805-1832)

The most prominent chemist in the generation following Lavoisier was Berzelius in Sweden. Together with Gay-Lussac in Paris and Davy in London, he discovered new elements, and improved atomic weights and combustion analysis for organic compounds. Invention of electrolysis led not only to new elements but also to the theory of dualism, with elements being held together by electrostatic attraction. Wöhler's report on the synthesis of urea revealed isomerism but also persistent naiveté about treating quantitative data. In their collaborative investigation of oil of bitter almonds Wöhler and Liebig extended dualism to organic chemistry via the radical theory.

Prof. J. Michael McBride
CHEM 125: Freshman Organic Chemistry, Fall 2008
(Yale University: Open Yale)
http://oyc.yale.edu
Date accessed: 2009-11-11
License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

Lecture Material

Click the play button to start the slideshow above (the slides will be displayed for 10 sec before advancing to the next slide). You can navigate the slides manually by using the back and forward buttons. Clicking the slide itself will advance to the next slide.

To download the above lecture material use this link. (Right-click and select Save Target As or Save Link As.)

Supplementary lecture material is listed below.

1. Combustion Analysis Lavoisier/Prout/Liebig/Dumas
2. Liebig's Kaliapparat and the etymology of K and Na
3. Distillation and the "Liebig" Condenser



 

Translate

Chinese (Simplified) French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish
More educational resources: